Tuesday, November 26, 2013

and then we made leaf bowls

This project is ALL over pinterest and the internet. I loved the idea so much that I decided to do it with my school kiddos.
We used a mixture of Mod Podge, white glue and water to start. I prepped the bases (we used buckets) with cooking spray and plastic wrap and set out trays of our glue mixture and dollar store leaves. I also sponged on the first coat of glue so the children could see how what the plan was.
 
 
We used sponge brushes to brush the sticky stuff on. Some of the children loved the sticky but others did not. For those who did not, they selected their leaves and placed them on the base while I held the leaves down for them to do the painting of the sticky.
 
We set them in the windowsill to dry but they were feeling a bit flimsy so I hit up our fabric store for some spray fabric stiffener and did another few rounds of spray for protection (they took about two days to fully dry). The children were super excited about their bowls and their families were also pretty keen. I think I will do this every year if the time and space allows for it. Happy Fall!

Monday, November 25, 2013

thank you pinterest...

...and all you crafty bloggers out there who share your ideas! Last week we read Fletcher and the Falling Leaves and worked on all sorts of Thanksgiving fun found through pinterest!
 This fine motor activity was inspired by Twoodaloo. I used floral foam cut to fit one of our small wooden crates. The picks were made by me, using stickers from Michael's and construction paper. Out of all of these projects, this one took the most prep time but the children loved it! Though it may be that they really loves the sound of the toothpicks going into the foam. Feathers were great too!
 This awesome rainbow button turkey inspired by Raptor Mama. This one I did turn into a color matching game as well as the fine motor aspect of the buttons. My threes had a hard time at first but soon got the hang of it and played with it over and over again.
 This awesome clothespin turkey inspired by Pink and Green Mama. Thank you to mr. a-go-go for drawing me the turkey. I used scrapbook paper for the wings and a glitter paper for the base. I had wanted to do the color matching turkey but our local Michael's was out of rainbow feathers so I went with this instead focusing on the fine motor movement of pinch the clothespins.
And this semi-modern take on the classic handprint turkey from Things to Share and Remember. The children chose their own colors for their turkeys and I painted their hands. They drew in their legs and eyes and selected their beaks and waddles. The backgrounds were painted on the backs of cereal boxes and then hot glue to cardboard. They also painted their noodles for the handles. I love, love, love how they turned out!



Sunday, November 24, 2013

art on their own time

 We have a window ledge reserved for drying artwork. My threes know to put their artwork there and I often find wonderful creations like these just sitting there. I'm lucky enough to have a very small class so that I can tell whose art shows up and I am happy that I keep out the different types of glue, paper punches, stampers, and a variety of papers and scraps  waiting for little hands to be turned into art.

Friday, November 8, 2013

jack o' lantern felt fun

The kiddos at school love themselves a flannel board. For Halloween I had planned on making a jack o' lantern board for them but time ran away from me.
 Then I found this pumpkin placemat decoration thing at either Micheal's, The Dollar Tree, or Target, I cannot remember. Either way, an idea bloomed. All I needed now was to get to work cutting out shapes for funny face making.
 And then that pesky time thing ran away once again but I stumbled upon sticky felt face pieces for pumpkins at Target and I snatched up one of each design. There were four in all.
After backing the sticky bits with regular old felt we were ready to decorate!
I supplemented the pieces with a bunch of circles and triangles cut from felt and popped them into the tray on our sticky easel.